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Oregon State University Sports Hall of Fame

The Oregon State University Athletic Hall of Fame was established in 1988 in an effort to honor and preserve the memory of those student-athletes, teams, coaches, and members of the athletic staff who have contributed in an outstanding and positive way to the promotion of the Oregon State University athletic and academic program.

To be considered for this high honor there are seven criteria that must be met:

  1. If a nominee was an athlete, the person must have completed his or her eligibility at least five (5) years prior to induction.
  2. If a student-athlete, the person must have earned two Varsity 'O' letters.
  3. If a coach, athletic administrator, or athletic staff member, the person must have either earned a Varsity 'O' letter at Oregon State University or have been on the staff for at least five (5) years and have become inactive at OSU.
  4. The records of the person considered should be so outstanding that there would be little question as to the qualifications necessary for induction.
  5. Consideration will be given for personal conduct in sports and the personal contribution to the idea of sport.
  6. Consideration will be given to teams who have contributed in a very outstanding and positive way.
  7. Criteria and qualifications will be based upon the nominees' participation while attending or serving Oregon State University. However, accomplishments after leaving the University may be an important part of consideration.

BASEBALL

Bailey Brem (1992)
Lettered in baseball from 1951-53 and was a key part of Oregon State's College World Series team in '52. Brem was the Beavers' second ever All-American selection (1953). He earned all-district and All-Pacific Coast Conference North acclaim in 1952 and '53. He also was a member of the '52 NCAA Western Regional Team. During his three varsity years the team complied a winning percentage of over 71 percent, including OSC's first ever back-to-back 20-plus win seasons. Brem posted a 4-1 record in 1953 in league games with 40 strikeouts and only three walks. His earned run average was an impressive 2.00. Brem was signed by the Detroit Tigers at the conclusion of the 1953 season along with teammates John Thomas and Bud Shirtcliff. He went on to play two seasons with the Eugene Emeralds and two with the Salem Senators of the Northwest League.

Jay Dean (1991)
Jay holds the career school batting record by 25 points. He had a .379 career average, including .465 as a senior and .456 as a junior. He was a two-time All-American first team selection and was named to the All-Northern Division squad three times. He also was twice named to the NCAA Western Regional Team. Dean was the team's MVP in 1954 and 1955.

Glenn Elliott (1991)
Glenn was one of the most feared pitchers in collegiate baseball in his era. Then coach Ralph Coleman penciled him in as a starter before Elliott's sophomore season, his first eligible year of varsity play. He led the team to the Northern Division title in 1940. He went on to play three seasons with the Boston Braves.

Ken Forsch (1991)
Ken played two seasons at Oregon State and earned second team All-Pac-8 acclaim in 1968. He holds the school record for strikeouts in one season (121) and pitched 48 scoreless innings in 1968. He played 15 years in the majors with Houston and California. Forsch threw no-hitters in 1979 against Atlanta and 1983 versus Montreal. He appeared in the MLB All-Star game twice.

Cecil Ira (1991)
Cecil lettered three years and many consider him the best pitcher in OSU history. He holds the school record for victories in one season (12), complete games in one season (12), and complete games in a career (28). He was 6-0 in league games in 1963 and 7-1 in 1962. Ira was signed by the White Sox.

Larry Petersen (2006)
Larry Petersen lettered in baseball from 1960-62 as an outfielder. Petersen earned All-America honors in 1960, when he batted a Northern Division-best .419 with 19 runs batted in. Petersen was named Oregon State's Most Valuable Player as a senior, and during his three seasons of varsity baseball the Beavers compiled a mark of 71-25. In addition to his All-America honor, Petersen was selected All-District by the American Baseball Coaches Association and All-Northern Division in 1960. Petersen helped the Beavers to the Northern Division championship as a senior in 1962, when Oregon State earned a trip to the NCAA West Regionals and was ranked No. 13 in the final national poll.

Harold "Red" Ridings (1991)
Red was an All-Pacific Coast Northwest selection in 1925. He led the team in batting in 1924 at .387. He lettered all four years and served as the team captain as a senior. He also played varsity basketball for three years and led the Pacific Coast Conference in scoring in 1924.

Frank Roelandt (1992)
Roelandt was a four-year baseball letterman and two-year basketball letterman at Oregon State College. He was a 1949 All-Coast baseball selection after leading the Northern Division with an incredible batting average of .508. He also led the league in hits, was second in runs, and third in runs batted in. He received the Victor Brown Trophy (team MVP). His four-year batting average was an impressive .387.

Roelandt's basketball career included being a member of the 1947 "Thrill Kids", a team that won the NCAA Western Regional and competed in the NCAA Tournament in Kansas City. Roelandt turned down a chance at professional baseball for the head basketball coaching position at Medford High School. He took the Black Tornado to 18 state tournaments; winning one title and finishing second three times. He concluded his career with 492 victories.

Wes Schulmerich (1992)
Wes had an outstanding baseball and football career. He was the 1927 baseball team captain and led the team to the '27 Northern Division title. He batted a team-high .459 in 1927. As a football player, he was named honorable mention All-American, second team All-Coast and All-Pacific Coast Conference. Schulmerich was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Clayton Shaw (1993)
Shaw lettered in baseball and basketball from 1939-41 and was a member of the Northern Division Championship teams in both sports in 1940. He was the 1941 baseball team captain, two-time Northern Division baseball selection, awarded the Locey Award after his senior year as the student who excelled in athletics leadership, sportsmanship, and scholarship.

"Clayton has the best right-hand curve we have ever seen in the Northern Division-and a good 'live' fast one too," wrote L.H. Gregory the sports editor of the Oregonian at the time. Legendary mentor Ralph Coleman named Shaw as one of the four best pitchers he ever coached at OSU. WWII thwarted a potential professional career with the Detroit Tigers.

Gene Tanselli (1991)
As a player at OSU, he lettered three years (1949-51). He started his coaching career in 1962 as an assistant and took over coaching duties in 1967. He led the Beavers to a third-place finish in the Pac-8 Conference in is first year as head coach. In 1951, he earned selections on the NCAA Western Regional Team and was selected a first team All-Northern Division Shortstop. He was on the 1951 team that won 18 straight games, a school record.

Jim Wilson (2003)
Jim Wilson was a two-sport athlete at OSU, playing baseball and football from 1980-82. Though he started 10 games as an offensive lineman in 1981, Wilson is best remembered for his standout baseball career. The first baseman from Corvallis was named the Pacific-10 Conference's Northern Division Most Valuable Player and third team All-American after leading the Beavers to the title in 1982. At the time of his induction in 2003, he held the school record for home runs in one season with 21 and for slugging percentage at .829 -- both set in 1982. Wilson was drafted in the second round by the Cleveland Indians, and later reached the Major League level with the Indians and Seattle Mariners. He finished his 13-year professional baseball career in Japan.

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S BASKETBALL

Lew Beck (1988)
Lew Beck led the 1947 team to the Pacific Coast Conference title. He earned All-American status at guard in 1947 and went on to captain the United States' gold-medal winning team in the 1948 Olympics. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Ray Blume (2004)
Ray Blume is considered one of the finest guards to ever play basketball at Oregon State University. He lettered from 1978-81 and was a member of some of the school's best-ever teams. Blume helped the Beavers to the No. 1 ranking in the nation as a senior. With Blume at the helm, Oregon State won two Pacific-10 Conference titles and accumulated a record of 86-27. The product of Parkrose High School in Portland was a two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection and a 1980 All-American. At the time of his induction in 2004, Blume ranked 12th for career scoring at OSU with 1,288 points. He left the program as the school's career leader for steals with 180 (3rd as of 2004). He also concluded his career third for field goal percentage at .539. Blume was selected in the second round of the 1981 NBA Draft by the Chicago Bulls.

Freddie Boyd (1992)
Lettered at Oregon State three seasons (1970-72) and was named the team MVP in '71 and '72. He earned All-American and All-Pac-8 acclaim as a senior. A two-time Far West Classic MVP. At the time of his enshrinement in 1992, he was 12th on the OSU career scoring list with 1,221 points (then fourth-highest ever). He set the school record for assists in one season his last two years. Scored a career-high 37 points in 1972 against UCLA. Had three other 30-plus scoring games. Boyd was the fifth selection in the first round of the NBA Draft by the Philadelphia 76ers at the conclusion of his OSU career. He played a total of seven seasons in the league, also competing for the New Orleans Jazz. Boyd stepped into the coaching ranks in his native Bakersfield, Cal., at Bakersfield Junior College and Graces Memorial High School. He became an assistant coach at OSU in 1987 and served in that role until 1992.

Juli Coleman (2003)
Juli Coleman lettered in women's basketball from 1982-85. Coleman earned All-American honors as a senior after averaging 23.9 points and shooting .515 from the field. During her career the Beavers compiled a four-year record of 85-31, which included two trips to the NCAA Tournament and the 1982 National Women's Invitational title. Coleman was selected to the NorPac All-Conference team three times, including first team twice. At the time of her graduation she ranked second at OSU for career points (1,840), field goals (691), scoring average (17.4), steals (276), and free throws (246). Coleman also excelled in the classroom, earning Second Team CoSIDA Academic All-American honors as senior and honorable mention as a sophomore and junior.

Lester Conner (1994)
Lester was a two-year letterman from 1981-82. He was selected an All-American, All-Pac-10, Pac-10 MVP in 1982. Conner helped the Beavers to pair of NCAA Tournament appearances, including the "Great Eight" his senior year. The Beavers also gained the No. 1 ranking in the nation with Conner at the helm. OSU captured two Pac-10 titles and amassed a sparkling 51-7 record. Conner's 91 steals in 1982 was an OSU record at the time, and his 2.5 steals per game average ranks second all-time at OSU. He had a school record seven swipes in one game four times. Conner also led the 1982 team for scoring at 14.9 and scored his career high of 24. The Golden State Warriors drafted him in the first round. His professional career also included stays with the Rockets, Nets, Bucks, Magic, Clippers, Pacers, and as an assistant coach with the Celtics, 76ers and Bucks.

Mel Counts (1988)
Mel Counts lettered at Oregon State from 1962-64 and was among the premier big men in college basketball during his tenure. He earned All-American status as a junior and senior. He led Oregon State to the 1963 Final Four, scoring 20-plus points in all five games, including 30 vs. Seattle in the first round. He left the school as the program's top all-time scorer with 1,973 points and as of June of 2003 still was Oregon State all-time leading rebounder with 489. Counts continued on to a lengthy NBA career, which included stints with the Celtics, Bullets, Lakers, Suns, Jazz, and 76ers. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.

Cliff Crandall (1990)
Cliff Crandall has the distinction of being the first individual Oregon State history to reach the 1,000-point plateau - he finished his career with 1,250. He lettered from 1947-49, and was a two-time All-American. Crandall led Oregon State to its first ever NCAA Tournament appearance in 1947 and to the Final Four in 1949. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Scott Eaton (1993)
Scott lettered in basketball from 1964-66 and in football in '66. He was an integral member of the '66 Pac-8 Conference Championship team coached by Paul Valenti. He averaged 9.9 points and 3.2 rebounds as a senior from his starting forward position. He was co-recipient of the Howard Merrill Trophy in '66 as the player who exemplifies the greatest desire and determination. He played one season for Dee Andros as a defensive back where he intercepted four passes. Eaton went on to play for the New York Giants of the NFL for six seasons.

Dave Gambee (1991)
Dave is one of only five Beaver basketball players to be tabbed an All-American twice. He garnered those high honors in 1957 and 1958, and was also an All-Pacific Coast Selection both years. He led the Beavers to the 1958 Pacific Coast Title and to three Far West Classic Championships. He was the 1957 Classic MVP. Gambee went on to play professionally with St. Louis, San Francisco, Philadelphia, San Diego, Milwaukee, and Detroit. Gambee was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

A.C. Green (1996)
A.C. Green was a four-year letterman during some of OSU's best ever basketball teams. Green led the Beavers to three NCAA Tournament appearances and one NIT. He helped OSU to the NCAA West Regional Championship game in 1982 as the team finished No. 4 in the nation in the AP and UPI polls. The Benson High School graduate earned third team All-American honors as a senior and honorable mention as a junior. He was named the Pac-10 player of the Year in 1984. He is also a member of the Pac-10's All-Decade Team. Green ranks in the top five at OSU for career scoring, rebounding, and free throws. At the conclusion of his college career, he was the third pick in the NBA Draft by the Los Angeles Lakers. He earned two championship rings with the Lakers. He played in the 1990 NBA All-Star Game and at the time of enshrinement in 1996, he had concluded his third year with the Phoenix Suns. He would later play for the Dallas Mavericks and Miami Heat.

Lee Harman (1991)
Lee was a 1959 All-American and All-Pacific Coast selection. He helped Oregon State to the 1958 Pacific Coast Conference title. He led the Beavers to three Far West Classic titles and was named to the all-tournament team twice. He scored 33 points in a 72-71 win in the 1959 FWC title game against Iowa.

Jim Jarvis (1991)
He was described as a "Bob Cousy type playmaker" by then sports information director John Eggers. He started a stretch of great guards at OSU, as he was tabbed a 1965 All-Pac-8 and All-American player. He led the 1963 team to the NCAA Western Regional title. OSU won three Far West Classics and he was selected to the all-tournament team twice. Jarvis is a 1987 State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame inductee.

Steve Johnson (1993)
Steve lettered four years for Ralph Miller from 1977-81. He was a consensus All-American in 1981 as well as the Pac-10 Player of the Year. He averaged 21 points and 7.7 rebounds as a senior. He shot .746 from the field as a senior and .710 as a junior, both NCAA records. His .678 career field goal percentage was a NCAA record at the time, and he holds the Pac-10 record for hitting each of his 13 field goals attempts in one game. He is the second all-time leading scorer at OSU with 2,035 points. Johnson scored a career-high 38 points twice. He left OSU for the pro ranks where he was a first round draft pick of the Kansas City Kings. He played for six other NBA teams. Johnson was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.

Tanja Kostic (2005)
Tanja Kostic is one of the premier women's basketball athletes to ever play at Oregon State University. The native of Sweden lettered from 1993-96. Kostic was a consensus All-American following her senior season, was a two-time Kodak District All-American, named Pac-10 Player of the Year twice, an All-Pac-10 Conference selection every season, and was selected Pac-10 Player of the Week eight times. At the time of her induction she held numerous Oregon State records, including scoring (2,349), scoring average (21.2), rebounds (1,001) and free throws made (608). Kostic guided the team to three NCAA Tournament appearances. During her tenure the Beavers finished No. 21 in the Associated Press Poll in 1995 and No. 22 in ‘96. Kostic continued her playing career in the ABL, WNBA, and in Spain, France, Israel, Italy and Germany.

Ed Lewis (1988)
Ed Lewis was named the best basketball player in the Northwest from 1900-1950 by the Oregon Journal. Lewis was an All-American center and captain who led the 1933 team to the Pacific Coast Conference title. He lettered from 1931-33. Lewis was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

John Mandic (1991)
John was the first player to ever be named to the All-Northern Division Team three times. He was selected to the All-American and All-Pacific Conference teams in 1942. He helped the Beavers to the 1940 and 1942 league titles. One of the biggest highlights of his career came when he hit a buzzer-beating bucket to defeat Oregon 27-26 on Feb. 13, 1942. Mandic was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.

Wally Palmberg (1991)
The legendary Hec Edmondson called him the best player on the West Coast during his era. He was a 1936 All-Pacific Coast Conference and All-American. He scored 187 points in 1936 to break the Northern Division scoring record. At the time he was the leading vote recipient in Northern Division history. Palmberg was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Gary Payton (1996)
Gary Payton is one of the most decorated basketball players in Oregon State history. Sports Illustrated, the U. S. Army Reserve, and the Pac-10 named Payton Player of the Year in 1990. He was a consensus All-American in 1990; three-time All-Pac-10 selection, and tabbed the conference's 1987 Freshman of the Year. He also was named to the Pac-10's All-Decade Team. At the time of his enshrinement in 1996, he held the school record for points, field goals, three- point field goals, assists, and steals. He finished his OSU career by scoring 30 or more points in 19 games, including a 58-point outburst against USC as a senior. During the Payton era, the Beavers made three NCAA Tournament appearances and one NIT. At the conclusion of his college career, he was the second pick in the NBA Draft by the Seattle SuperSonics. As of 1996, he had made three NBA All-Star Game appearances. He also led the Sonics to the 1996 NBA Finals. He earned a gold medal at the 1996 Olympic Games while playing for Dream Team III.

Red Rocha (1990)
Red Rocha earned All-Pacific Coast Conference honors in 1945, '46, and '47. He also was selected a 1947 All-American. He played in the NBA for 10 years and won a championship ring with Syracuse in 1955. Rocha was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Carol Menken-Schaudt (1988)
Carol Menken was the women's basketball program's first All-American, earning the honor in 1981. She lettered from 1979-81 and still holds school records for career points (2,243), rebounds (901), field goal percentage (.692), and single game scoring with 51 points against Alaska-Anchorage. Menken was a three-time Northwest College Sports Association all-conference selection. She was a member of the 1984 Olympic team and went on to play professionally overseas. Menken was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1993.

Adolph Sieberts (1990)
Adolph was a two-time All-Pacific Coast Conference selection and the school's first ever basketball All-American in 1916. He also played baseball, leading the team to the 1916 division title.

Charlie Sitton (1997)
Sitton lettered under Ralph Miller from 1981-84. During his era, Oregon State made three NCAA Tournament appearances and one NIT. He helped Oregon State to a four-year record of 93-25, a winning mark of 79%. He was a two-time All-American, and a three-time All-Pac-10 selection. He is the fifth all-time leading scorer at OSU (1,561), and fourth all-time for field goal percentage (.575). As a freshman, he helped Oregon State to the No. 1 ranking in the nation. The Dallas Mavericks drafted him in the second round after his senior season. Sitton was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.

Judy Spoelstra (1994)
Judy lettered two years at Oregon State from 1982-83. She was a second team Kodak All-American and first team All-NorPac selection in 1983. She was a Wade Trophy finalist and named to the Western Region All-Tournament team. The Beavers compiled a two-year record of 44-14 during Spoelstra's tenure. She led the team to the NIT title in 1982 and a trip to the NCAA's in '83 where the team advanced to the "Sweet Sixteen". She averaged 15.4 points as a junior and 12.3 as a senior. Her 14 assists in one game and her 173 total assists for 1983 stand as school records. After she left OSU she served as a player/coach in the Japan Women's League from 1983-86. She earned all-league honors three times and was MVP in 1984. Spoelstra also served as an assistant coach at the University of Idaho for three seasons and as head coach at Montana State for six years before accepting the reigns of the Oregon State program. While at Montana State she led the Bobcats to four conference tournament berths and the 1993 conference title. She was named the Big Sky Conference Coach of the Year.

Charlie White (1991)
Charlie was a 1966 All-Pac-8, All-American, and team MVP. His impressive play helped OSU to the 1966 Pac-8 title, marking the only time in an 18-year span that UCLA did not win the conference championship.

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S ROWING

Amy Martin (2003)
Amy was a three-year letterwinner (1994-96). She was selected OSU's Most Valuable Oarswoman twice and earned first team All Pac-10 acclaim twice. She also earned inclusion on the Pac-10 All-Academic team in 1996. Her post-collegiate career involved appearing in three World Championships as a member of the U.S. Women's National Team and she competed in the 2000 Olympic Games. She earned a sliver medal in the 1999 World Championships, and a bronze medal in 1998.

Tom Woodman (2003)
Tom came to OSU in 1976 and lettered in rowing in 1977 and 1978. He returned to OSU in 1980 to coach the men's rowing program. His team won the Pac-10 title in 1981 and four team members went on to make national squads. Before returning to coach, Woodman was a member of the four-with-coxswain that competed in the World Championships in New Zealand, placing fourth. He was also a member of the National Team, which captured gold at the Pan American Games and finished fifth at the World Championships. He later earned sliver as part of the four at the World Championships in 1981.

Robert Zagunis (1993)
Zagunis was Oregon State's first ever national team member. He was a member of the USA team at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal stroking the four-with-coxswain event. He served as an alternate the year before at the World Rowing Championships in England and at the Pan American Games in Mexico City. Zagunis led OSU to its first ever title at the National Intercollegiate Rowing Championships when the varsity four set a course record in 1975, which stood for 15 years. Zagunis was the 1974 and '75 Most Valuable Oarsman and the outstanding senior oarsman in '75. At the time of enshrinment, he was on the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors for the United States Rowing Association.

FOOTBALL

Herb Abraham (1990)
Herb was Oregon State's first All-American in the sport. He led the Aggies to an upset at Michigan State in 1915.

Bill Austin (1990)
Bill earned All-Coast honors as a tackle in 1948 and played in the 1949 East-West Shrine Game. He played for the New York Giants for five seasons, and later coached for the Packers, Rams, Steelers, Redskins, Bears, and Cardinals. Austin was a 1982 inductee into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame.

Sam Baker (1991)
Sam lettered at Oregon State three years (1950-52) and many consider him the greatest athlete to ever graduate from Corvallis High School. He earned All-Coast honors as a running back as a senior. He was OSU's MVP three times and he was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980. Baker ranked fourth in school history for rushing at the time of his enshrinement with 1,947 yards. He played 17 professional seasons, including stints with Washington, Cleveland, Dallas, and Philadelphia.

Terry Baker (1988)
The Heisman Trophy winner was the nation's most heralded athlete after leading OSU to a 1962 Liberty Bowl victory. Baker was a first team All-American in 1962, and in addition was named the Sportsman of the Year (SI), Helms Foundation Award recipient, AP, UPI, and The Sporting News Player of the Year to name just a few. The two-time Oregon State team MVP played in the 1962 College All-Star Game. Baker also excelled in basketball where he helped the 1963 team to the Final Four. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980. His number 11 is retired at OSU. At the time of his induction he was the only individual to win the Heisman Trophy and play in the Final Four. Baker was the first individual from the West Coast to win the Heisman.

Ted Bates (1991)
Ted earned All-American acclaim as an offensive lineman in 1958, as well as All-Pacific-Coast Conference and All-Coast selection. He played in the 1957 Rose Bowl and was the recipient of the 1958 Hayward Award for the top amateur athlete in the state. Bates played in the 1958 East-West Shrine and Hula Bowl games. He played four NFL seasons with the Chicago Cardinals. Bates was a 1996 inductee into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame.

Paul Brothers (1997)
Brothers lettered for three years (1964-66) at quarterback. He guided OSU to an 8-3 record in 1964 and a trip to the Rose Bowl. At the time of his induction he was fifth at OSU for all-time total yards (3,155) and tied for fifth for career touchdown passes (14). A three-year starter, he led the team to a 20-11 record. He earned second team All-Coast honors in 1966. The Dallas Cowboys was drafted him in '66, before playing in the Canadian Football League with British Columbia and Ottawa from 1968-72.

Steve Brown (1993)
Steve was a three-year varsity letterman form 1970-72. All-American honors by nine organizations and publications, including seven first team selections. Two-time All-Pac-8, two-time All-Coast and two-time team defensive MVP. Brown came to OSU as a fullback before moving to the defensive side as a freshman. He had a school record 186 tackles as a senior. As a junior he led the team with 134 tackles and had four interceptions against defending conference champion Stanford. He also had 22 tackles in that same '71 game vs. Stanford. At the conclusion of his OSU career he played in the East-West Shrine Game, Hula Bowl and Coaches All-American Bowl. Brown was the team captain of the West in the Shrine Game and co-captain of the North Squad in the Hula Bowl where he made 19 tackles and intercepted three passes. He also had 15 tackles and one interception in the Coaches All-American Bowl. He went on and played professionally for Calgary in 1973 and for the Portland Storm in 1974 before suffering a career ending knee injury.

Vern Burke (1991)
Vern is still considered one the best receivers to ever wear an Oregon State uniform. He caught 69 passes for 1,007 yards in 1962, both NCAA records at the time. At the time of his enshrinement he held OSU records for the most passes caught in one game (12) and career receiving touchdowns (19). He was a consensus All-American in 1963 and played five years of professional football. Burke played in the 1963 East-West Shrine and Hula Bowl games. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.

Jules Carlson (1994)
Jules lettered from 1926-28 and helped OSU to a record of 16-7-1 over that period. Only a loss to Southern California in 1926 prevented Oregon State from an undefeated season and league title. He played offensive tackle and went on to play eight seasons for the Chicago Bears, earning All-Pro acclaim. He finished his career in 1937 with the Chicago Cardinals. His career included playing in three title games, capturing two championships.

Ken Carpenter (1991)
Ken was an All-Coast running back as a senior and later played in the East-West Shrine Game. When he was inducted he held the school record for all-purpose yards (3,903), fifth in rushing (1,910), seventh in total offense (2,846), and fifth in career scoring (144 pts.) He was a first round draft pick of Cleveland in 1950. He played three seasons with the Browns, eight for the CFL's Saskatchewan Roughriders and one with Denver of the AFL. Carpenter was a 1982 inductee into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame.

Herm Clark (1990)
Herm Clark was an All-Pacific Coast Conference right tackle in 1951. He was overlooked for many national collegiate honors. Clark played for the Chicago Bears at the conclusion of his college career.

Jimmy Clark (1991)
Jimmy is considered one of Oregon State's top lineman in the history of the program. He was a two-way starter and played in three postseason bowl games - the East-West Shrine Game, Hula Bowl, and College All-Star Game. He was drafted by the Washington Redskins and played two seasons. He was also an outstanding wrestler and earned the 1951 Pacific Coast Conference heavyweight title.

Steve Coury (2003)
Steve was by most accounts Oregon State's MVP in the decade of the 1970's. He was selected first team all-league in the Pac-10 as a senior in 1979. The offensive MVP also earned second team All-Coast. He played in the Blue-Gray Classic and East-West Shrine games. Coury set the record for career receiving yards (1,837) and receptions (135). He accounted for 142 receiving yards in a 1979 game. The four-year letterman went on to play at Ottawa in 1980 before embarking on a coaching career.

Tom DeSylvia (1994)
Tom lettered at OSU from 1946-49. Playing on both sides of the ball, he earned second team All-Coast and honorable mention All-American acclaim in 1949. He played in the East-West Shrine and College All-Star games at the end of his senior year. He was also team captain as a senior. DeSylvia was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1950 immediately after he served in WWII. He later went on to coach football, wrestling, and baseball, where he earned PIL Coach of the Year honors twice. He was also Man of the Year at the Hayward Banquet in 1959, recipient of the Martin Luther King Award for Human Rights in 1982, and was inducted into the National Football Hall of Fame Walk of Champions in 1988.

John Didion (1991)
In 1968, Didion earned consensus All-American honors as a center. As a junior, he was a second team All-American selection by AP and UPI. At the conclusion of his college career, he played in the Coaches All-America, Senior Bowl, Hula Bowl, College All-Star, and East-West Shrine games. He was drafted in the seventh round by the Washington Redskins, and enjoyed a pro career that included stints with the Redskins, Saints, Bears, and Seahawks.

Jim Dixon (1990)
Jim Dixon played from 1924-26 and was an All-American and All-Coast left tackle selection as a senior. He served as an assistant coach at Oregon State from 1933-51. The Dixon Recreation Center on campus is named in his honor.

Don Durdan (1988)
All-Coast member of the 1942 Rose Bowl championship team and All-American basketball player. He played professionally for the San Francisco 49ers. Durdan was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bill Enyart (1991)
Bill was the third all-time leading rusher in OSU history with 2,155 yards at the time of his induction. He holds the OSU record for rushing yards in one game with 299 against Utah in 1968. He was a first team All-American in 1968 and was twice name All-Pacific-8. Enyart also was a two-time CoSIDA Academic All-American. He was named the 1968 Hula Bowl Most Valuable Back. He also played in the Senior Bowl, East-West Shrine, College All-Star, and the All-American Bowl games. He was drafted by Buffalo and later played for Oakland.

Joe Francis (1991)
Many have called Joe Francis the greatest tailback to ever play at Oregon State. He led OSU to a 7-3-1 record and a Rose Bowl appearance. He was an All-Coast pick as a senior and named the best player on the West Coast. He was also named the Hayward Award winner in 1957. He is a member of the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame. He played two seasons for Green Bay and Montreal in the professional ranks.

Red Franklin (1991)
Red earned All-American honors in 1933. He had an outstanding career as a halfback and kick returner. At the time of his induction, he held the second longest kickoff return in school history with 94-yard gallops against Fordham and San Francisco during the 1933 season. He played three years for Brooklyn of the NFL. Franklin was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Rockne Freitas (1991)
Rockne lettered three years as a center and played on the 1965 Rose Bowl team. He also played in the Hula Bowl, Coaches All-America Bowl and the College All-Star Game. He was drafted by Pittsburgh in the third round, but played all 10 of his professional seasons with Detroit.

Bill Gray (1991)
Bill earned first team All-American status in 1946 after helping OSU to a 7-1-1 record. He lettered in 1942 before having his Oregon State career interrupted by WWII. Following his graduation, he was drafted by the NFL's Washington Redskins, where he played two seasons.

Joe Gray (1991)
"The Gray Ghost" was an outstanding halfback on both offense and defense from 1935-37. He was a first team All-Coast pick as a senior and was mentioned on several other All-Coast teams as a junior. At the time, he was called the greatest running and passing back ever to play at the school. He was the first Oregon State player ever drafted in the first round by the NFL (Chicago).

Quentin Greenough (1991)
Quentin played two seasons at Oregon State and stared at center in the 1942 Rose Bowl against Duke. As a senior he was named All-Coast and second team All-American. He played in the 1944 East-West Shrine Game. He later served as an assistant coach at Oregon State. Greenough was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bob Grim (1991)
Bob earned three letters at OSU. He played in the 1965 Rose Bowl, the 1966 Hula Bowl, Coaches All-American Bowl, College All-Star Game, East-West Shrine Game, and the Senior Bowl. He was voted the Senior Bowl's Outstanding Back. Grim was a second round draft pick of Minnesota and went on to play 11 NFL seasons, which also included time with the Giants and Bears. He played in two Super Bowls (IV, XI). He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.

Craig Hanneman (1992)
A three-year letterman defensive lineman from 1968-70. He was selected a second team All-American in 1970 and first team All-Pac-8 and All-Coast. He was named OSU's 1968 Rookie of the Year and 1970 defensive MVP and team captain. Hanneman's top games included 13 tackles versus UCLA and 12 against California in the '70 season. He also recovered two fumbles against Houston and had three tackles for losses for 33 yards against Oklahoma. At the conclusion of his senior season, he played in the Hula Bowl, Coaches All-American Bowl and East-West Shrine Game. He was drafted in the sixth round by the Pittsburgh Steelers and played for the club from 1972-73. He concluded his professional career with a New England Patriots from 1974-76.

Rich Koeper (1991)
Rich was one of the greatest offensive linemen in Oregon State's history. He played in the 1962 Liberty Bowl and 1965 Rose Bowl. He earned second team All-American honors as a senior. Koeper also was an All-Pac-8 pick as a senior and first team All-Coast as a sophomore. He played in the 1964 Hula bowl. He was drafted by Green Bay and played three seasons in the NFL. He later served as an assistant coach under Dee Andros.

Jess Lewis (1990)
Jess Lewis was a 1967 All-American and two-time All-Pac-8 Conference defensive tackle. He was selected the team MVP in 1969. He also was a standout wrestler, capturing three conference and two NCAA wrestling titles. In addition, Lewis competed in the 1968 World University and Olympic Games. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Percy Locey (1990)
Percy was the team captain in 1923 and is recognized as one of the best lineman in the history of Oregon State. He played in the 1925 East-West Shrine Game. Locey was a charter member of the NFL Hall of Fame after serving as a player and coach with Oakland. He later coached at the University of Denver. He lettered at OSU in 1915 and 1921-23. Locey was a 1981 State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame inductee.

Billy Main (1992)
A three-year letterman running back from 1967-69. He was named OSU's Rookie of the Year in '67, most improved offensive player in '68, and offensive MVP in '69. Main's national recognition included being a two-time second team All-Pac-8 selection and an honorable mention selection in '69. He was also a member of the second team on the 1968 All-Coast Team and an honorable mention pick in 1969. The Pittsburgh Steelers drafted him in the 13th round. During Main's three-year varsity career the Beavers posted a cumulative record of 20-9-1, which included being part of the memorable '67 "Giant Killers." In 1968 he rushed for three touchdowns against Stanford and was named the Pac-8 Player of the Week. Main's name appears in numerous categories of the Oregon State record book even to this day, and the time of induction was second for total points (162), third in all-purpose rushing (3,292) and seventh for total rushing yards (1,621).

Howard Maple (1990)
Howard lettered at Oregon State from 1926-28. He was a second team All-American quarterback as a senior. He earned All-Coast recognition twice. Knute Rockne called him "the ideal quarterback." He went on to play pro football for the Chicago Cardinals and baseball for the Washington Senators. Maple was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Bill McKalip (1990)
Known as "Wild Bill" McKalip, he played at Oregon State from 1926-28. As a senior he earned All-Pacific Coast Conference First Team, Associated Press All-Northwest First Team, and United Press International All-Coast Second Team. At the conclusion of his college career, he played in the 1930 East-West Shrine Game. He later was a three-time All-Pro selection with Portsmouth and Detroit. McKalip was a 1991 inductee into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame.

Hal Moe (1990)
Hal Moe contributed to the football and track programs at Oregon State. He was an All-Coast selection in football as a senior and advanced to the pro game playing one season for the Chicago Cardinals. He returned to Oregon State to serve as an assistant football coach from 1933-54 and the head track coach from 1952-58. Moe was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.

Jack O'Billovich (1991)
Jack earned All-American honors as a junior and helped Oregon State to the 1965 Rose Bowl. He also earned All-Coast as a junior and All-Pac-8 as a senior. He was the team captain as a senior and went on to play in the Hula Bowl and East-West Shrine Game. O'Billovich played the 1967 season with the Canadian Football League's Hamilton TigerCats.

Pete Pifer (1990)
Pete Pifer lettered at running back from 1964-66. He was the team's MVP as a junior and senior after rushing for over 1,000 yards both seasons. Pifer was named the outstanding running back on the West Coast as a senior and the United Press International Back of the Year in '66. Pifer ended his collegiate career as the school's all-time leading rusher with 2,233 yards. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1991.

George "Gap" Powell (1990)
Powell lettered in football and track from 1918-21. He was a two-time All-Coast selection in football and earned All-American honors in 1921. Powell was also the 1920 Pacific Coast Conference shot champion. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Hall of Fame in 1982.

Steve Preece (1991)
Steve quarterbacked the Beavers to a 14-5-1 record in his final two seasons. OSU finished the 1967 season ranked seventh and 13th in 1968. He was the team's MVP in 1967 and 1968. He played nine years in the NFL with New Orleans, Philadelphia, Denver, Los Angeles Rams, and Seattle. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1988.

Rocky Rasley (1993)
Rocky lettered at OSU from 1967-68. He was a starter at offensive guard for Dee Andros. UPI first team All-Pacific Coast at the conclusion of his senior season. He was drafted in the ninth round of the 1969 NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions. He also played professionally with New Orleans, Kansas City, Seattle, and San Francisco. Rasley also wrestled at OSU as the No. 2 heavyweight behind Hall of Famer Jess Lewis. He wrestled in the World Games of 1969 in Argentina.

Jon Sandstrom (1991)
Jon was a three-year starting defensive lineman form 1966-1968. He was a first team All-American as a junior and was a preseason All-American in 1969. Sandstrom earned first team All-Pac-8 as a senior and was named the team's MVP. He played in the College All-Star Game, Hula Bowl, Senior Bowl and Coaches All-America Bowl at the conclusion of his college career. Sandstrom was drafted in the third round in 1969 by the Falcons, and would also play for the Canadian Football League's Winnipeg Blue Bombers.

Eberle Schultz (1991)
Eberle played both ways on the line, but earned most of his accolades for his play on the offensive side of the ball. He earned first team All-Coast honors in 1939 and helped Oregon State post a 9-1-1 mark that season. He was drafted by Philadelphia in the fourth round of the NFL Draft and played a total of six pro seasons, including stops in Pittsburgh and Cleveland.

Adolphe "Ade" Schwammel (1990)
Schwammel lettered in football from 1931-33, earning first team All-American and All-Pacific Coast as a senior. He was one of the key players in the now illegal "pyramid play." Schwammel played in the 1934 East-West Shrine Game. He won two professional titles in his six years with the Green Bay Packers.

Vic Sears (1991)
Vic was an All-American lineman in 1940, the second lineman in school history to earn such acclaim. He lettered three seasons and was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers at the conclusion of his college career. He never played for the Steelers, but played for Philadelphia for 10 years. Sears, who played in the 1941 East-West Shrine Game, was inducted into the State of Oregon Hall of Fame in 1980.

Aaron Thomas (1990)
Aaron Thomas played from 1958-60 as an end. Following his college career he played in the East-West Shrine Game, College All-Star Game, Coaches All-America Bowl, and the Senior Bowl. He played professionally for the New York Giants and San Francisco 49ers, earning a roster spot in the 1964 Pro Bowl. He later served as the assistant director of the Beaver Club from 1983-89. Thomas was inducted into the State of Oregon Hall of Fame in 1982.

William "Skip" Vanderbundt (1993)
Skip lettered in football from 1965-67 and in baseball in 1967. All-Pacific Coast selection in 1967, Coaches All-American second team as a senior, played in the East-West Shrine Game, Hula Bowl and Coaches All-American Game. He served as the team's co-captain in '67 and finished the season being honored as the team's defensive MVP. He also led the team with four interceptions in '67. Vanderbundt had an outstanding professional career with the San Francisco 49ers and New Orleans Saints. He was a second team All-Pro selection in '72 and defensive MVP of the 49ers in '76.

John Witte (1991)
John was a two-time All-American selection, the only OSU player to ever achieve such status at the time of his playing career. He played in the 1957 Rose Bowl game against Iowa. He also was an outstanding wrestler, finishing second at the NCAA Championships as a freshman. Inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.

Len Younce (1988)
All-Pro for the NFL's New York Giants after a stellar career as a punter and guard for OSU teams that went 19-7-3. Younce was an All-Coast selection in 1940 and played in the 1941 East-West Shrine Game. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S GOLF

Bob Allard (1991)
Bob was a 1969 honorable mention All American. He was the medalist at the Northern Division and Pac-10 Tournaments. He also led OSU to the 1969 Northern Division title.

Dr. Mary Budke (1992)
Along with her numerous individual tournament titles, Budke captured the 1972 U.S. Women's Amateur and was member of the 1974 Curtis Cup Team. She was the AIAW Champion in '74 while competing for OSU and was the runner-up two years previous. She also won the Oregon Amateur Championship eight times. Budke was the recipient of the Hayward Award as Oregon's top amateur athlete in 1972. She was the lone woman and one of only three golfers to be honored in the history of the award as of '72. At the time of her Hayward Award she was ranked number one in the U.S. for amateurs. While as a prep at Dayton High School she captured the state championship in 1971. She also was presented with a lifetime individual membership at the Michalbrook Country Club in McMinnville. Budke was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1991 and the National Golf Coaches Association Player Hall of Fame in 1996.

Gracie DeMoss (1991)
Gracie is one of the most decorated amateur golfers ever. She was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986. She won the Oregon State Women's Golf Championship five times, the 1949 Canadian National Golf Championship, and the 1950 Pacific Northwest Championship to name just a few of her titles. She also held the Corvallis Country Club course record (66) for over 25 years. She played in the Curtis Cup in 1952 and '54.

Dick Yost (1990)
Yost was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982. He played at Oregon State from 1948-51 and was a two-time Northern Division champion. He participated in the NCAA Tournament three times, and in 1951 upset Don January in the first round. Yost was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.

GYMNASTICS

Mary Ayotte-Law (1993)
Mary lettered at OSU from 1979-82. She earned All-American status in 1981 on the balance beam and in 1982 on floor exercise and all-around. She won the national championship in 1982 on floor and finished third in the all-around, the highest ever by a Beaver. She also finished seventh in the all-around by 1981. She won the Regional all-around all four years. Ayotte-Law concluded her OSU career with seven top-10 finishes at Nationals and held three school records. She was honored with the American Award for Athletic and Academic Performance. She represented the United States in 1981 at the World University Games in Romania, where she was the highest all-around competitor. She was named the team's most outstanding gymnast three times and the Corvallis Gazette-Times' Outstanding Gymnast three times.

Laurie Carter-Freeman (1994)
Laurie was a four-year letterwinner from 1981-1984. She distinguished herself as OSU's first-ever national champion by winning the balance beam competition in 1981. Carter went on to earn All-American status on the beam in 1983 and 1984 by placing in the top eight each year. She earned three Regional titles on the beam and set then an NCAA record of 9.9 on the beam in 1983. She helped OSU to a record of 79-24-1. During her tenure OSU finished in the Top-10 nationally three times.

Traci Crover (2005)
Traci Crover was one of only six gymnasts in Oregon State history to earn All-American status on three-plus events at the time of her induction. In all, she earned All-American status five times. Crover lettered from 1991-94 and helped the program to a combined record of 57-12. She helped the Beavers win three Pac-10 Conference titles, the 1991 and ‘92 Regional Championships, and finish in the top seven of the NCAA Championships all four of her years.She earned All-Pac-10 Conference honors twice. Crover was the co-Regional champion on the beam as a junior and earned All-America honors on the beam, bars and floor. Crover was also a standout in the classroom where she was named a CoSIDA Academic All-American as a senior and was a four-time National Association of Collegiate Gymnastics Coaches Scholastic All-American.

Amy Durham (2004)
Amy Durham lettered in gymnastics from 1990-93 and at the time of her enshrinement in 2004 was one of only two Beavers to earn All-America honors in four events. As a senior, Durham won the NCAA national title in the floor exercise by scoring a perfect 10.0. She also earned first-team All-America honors as a senior in the all-around and second team All-America acclaim on vault twice and on bars as a junior. Durham helped OSU win a pair of Pacific-10 and NCAA West Regional titles, and she propelled the Beavers to finish in the top seven at the NCAA Championships each of her four years. She also competed in the 1991 World University Games. In addition to her athletic accomplishments, Durham earned Academic All-America honors as a senior.

Chari Knight (2003)
Chari Knight is one of the most decorated gymnasts in OSU history. The seven-time All-American is one of only two individuals in school history to earn All-American honors in four events. Knight earned regional titles three times in all-around, twice on floor and beam, and once on bars and vault. She also was a two-time Pac-10 Conference Gymnast of the Year. As a freshman, she matched the school record by finishing second on bars at the NCAA Championships. Knight scored a perfect 10 eight times during her collegiate career, including on five occasions on the bars. At the time of her induction, Knight was still actively competing and had participated in the last two U.S. Championships, and was a member of the 2000 U.S. Olympic Team selection committee.

Linda Parker (1992)
The second Oregon State gymnast to earn All-American status, claiming her honors on floor exercise (4th) in 1978 and balance beam (6th) in 1980. She was also a three-time member of the All-Western Region Team. While at OSU, Parker led her team to two fourth-place finishes (1980 and '82) at the National Championships, and three regional titles. Parker lettered four years.

Joy Selig-Peterson (1997)
Joy Selig is arguably the best-ever gymnast at Oregon State University. She lettered from 1988-91, and was a seven-time All-American. She earned the NCAA title on the balance beam twice and once on floor exercise. She was named to the Pac-10 Conference Women's All-Decade Team in 1995 (all sports). She was the 1991 American Award recipient-given to the nation's top gymnast. Selig was a three-time Academic All-American. At the time of her graduation, she held the school record in the all-around, balance beam, and floor exercise. She was the NCAA Woman of the Year for Oregon and participated in the World University Games in 1991.

MULTI-SPORT

Dave Brundage (2004)
Dave Brundage was a two-sport athlete at Oregon State University, lettering in baseball from 1984-86 and football in 1985. On the diamond, Brundage was an outstanding outfielder, pitcher and first baseman. In 1986, he was named the Pacific-10 Conference Northern Division's Most Valuable Player and earned All-West Region and All-America honors. That season, he batted .366 with eight home runs, 44 runs batted in, 29 stolen bases, and he was 8-4 on the mound with a 3.19 earned run average. Brundage left OSU with a .350 career batting average, the third-best in the history of the program at that time. The Beavers earned two NCAA Regional baseball bids during Brundage's career. He left OSU in 1986 after being drafted in the fourth round by the Philadelphia Phillies. He played professional baseball for nine years and at the time of enshrinement had managed for seven years in the Seattle Mariners organization. Brundage was named the Minor League Manager of the Year in 2003 while with AA San Antonio.

John Thomas (1997)
Thomas was a three-sport athlete at Oregon State, lettering in football and baseball. He also played basketball and would have lettered if not for baseball coach Ralph Coleman requesting he participate in baseball winter conditioning. He is best known for his achievements in football and baseball. He lettered in football from 1949-50, and was selected an All-Coast offensive end in 1951. He caught a then-school record 36 passes for 350 yards in 1950, which ranked second on the Coast and 10th nationally. He played in the College All-Star and East-West Shrine Games after his senior year. Thomas lettered in baseball from 1951-53, and played on the 1952 College World Series team as a catcher. He also was an assistant football coach under Tommy Prothro at Oregon State.

Dallas Ward (1997)
Ward lettered in football from 1924-26, starting all 25 games, as a receiver. He earned second team All-Coast acclaim as a senior and honorable mention as a junior. He also lettered two years in baseball and basketball. Ward has the distinction of serving as a team captain at one time in each of the three sports he played. While at Oregon State he was named to five honorary organizations for his academic achievements, and earned the top rank of student colonel in ROTC. Ward Left Oregon State to become a head football coach at a major high school in Minneapolis, thanks in part to a recommendation letter sent by Knute Rockne. Ward later accepted an assistant head coach position at the University of Minnesota. Ward was appointed the head football coach at the University of Colorado in 1948, and in 1957 led the Buffaloes to an Orange Bowl victory over Clemson - the program's first-ever bowl appearance. Ward has a state-of-the-art athletic facility named after him at the University of Colorado. He is also one of the first people to be inducted into the State of Colorado Sports Hall of Fame.

SKIING

Jean Saubert (1991)
Jean has the distinction of being the first Oregon State woman to ever win a medal in the Olympic Games. She captured a silver and bronze at the 1964 Games in Innsbruck, Austria. She won more than 100 races and was a member of the U.S. National Team for three years. Saubert was a 1983 inductee into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame.

SOFTBALL

Erin Capps (2006)
Erin Capps was Oregon State's first All-American in the sport of softball, earning the honor in 1983. The Whittier, Calif., native left the program as a four-year letterwinner. At the time of her enshrinement, she held the school record for career triples with 18. Upon her graduation in 1985, she also held career school records for singles (113), hits (151) and doubles (18), and was second for runs batted in (55). The catcher helped Oregon State to one of its best-ever seasons in 1984 when the team had a 40-17 record. She also helped Oregon State post a 26-3 mark against Oregon during her playing career. In addItion to her All-America honor, Capps received All-Region and All-NorPac accolades.

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S SWIMMING

Amy Van Loben Sels (2005) Amy van Loben Sels has the distinction of being Oregon State's first All-American in the sport of women's swimming. Van Loben Sels placed eighth in the 50-yard freestyle at the 1994 NCAA Championships and 10th in ‘95, earning All-America honors both years. At the time of induction in 2005, she still possessed the school record in the 50-yard freestyle (23.11) and 100-yard freestyle (50.64). Van Loben Sels left OSU as the school's career record holder for dual meet victories with 55.

Dr. Jerald Wille (1994)
Jerry Wille lettered at OSU from 1963-66, earning All-American honors in 1965 in the 100-yard breaststroke, the first ever by a Beaver swimmer. He captured All-American acclaim again in 1966. He was the first OSU swimmer to ever make the finals of the NCAA Championships. Wille served as an assistant swimming coach from 1968-70, then went on to coach at the YMCA. He was on the Corvallis Aquatics Center Club Board of Directors and president of the Corvallis Aquatics Center. He also served as a member of the Oregon Math Education Council and a part-time professor in the Department of Statistics at OSU. Wille is a National Certified Official in U.S. Swimming.

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S TRACK AND FIELD

Steve DeAutremont (1992)
A two-time NCAA Champion in the hammer with throws of 190-5 in 1969 and 203-9 in 1970. His championships were preceded by a seventh place showing in the 1968 NCAA's. Steve did have the school record in the hammer for 17 years with a career best of 207-2 in 1970. He also set the Bell Field record in 1967. He concentrated on the hammer for most of his career after also competing in the discus and shot in his sophomore and freshman seasons. Following his OSU career he won the 1974 AAU title and was a four-time member of the USA Track and Field team. He also was a part-time throwing coach at OSU and helped develop All-Americans Butch Schmidt and Tim Fox. His father, Chuck, was an All-American athlete at Southern Oregon College.

Lynn Dickey (1991)
Lynn was Oregon State's first NCAA track champion, winning the 1952 pole vault with a mark of 13-9. Dickey broke three dual meet records and won the Northern Division pole-vaulting crown with an effort of 14 1/8. He lettered three years at OSU.

Dick Fosbury (1988)
The Fosbury Flop founder went on to capture the gold at the 1968 Olympics with a record high jump of 7-4 1/4. Fosbury was a two-time NCAA Champion. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame, and U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1992.

Cindy Greiner (2004)
Cindy Greiner is one of the premier track and field athletes in the history of Oregon State University. She lettered in track from 1980-81. Greiner earned All-America honors as a senior when she placed fourth at the AIAW and set the United States record in the heptathlon with 5,420 points. She also won a regional title in 1981. Greiner later represented the U.S. in the heptathlon in the Olympics in 1984, 1988 and 1992. She finished fourth in 1984 and eighth in 1988. Greiner's career also included earning United States national championships in 1984 and 1990. Greiner was the gold medalist at the 1987 Pan American Games and earned a silver medal in 1983. Morgan Groth (1991)
Morgan won both the 800 and 1500 meters at the Olympic Trials, but an injury forced him to miss the 1964 Olympic Games. The following year he broke the U.S. record in the 880 with a time of 1:47.5. He earned All-American acclaim twice at OSU and won the 1963 NCAA title in the mile with a time of 4:05.3. At the time of his induction he held the school record in the 880 and had the second best time in the mile.

Darrell Horn (1991)
Darrell was a three-time All-American in the triple jump. He won the Northern Division long jump title three straight years. He held the school record in both the long and triple jumps during his career.

Joni Huntley (1988)
Olympic high jumper in 1976 and 1984 winning the bronze in '84. She was the recipient of the prestigious Hayward Award, signifying the state's top amateur athlete. During her career, she was ranked No. 1 in the U.S. five times and appeared in the top 10 for 13 consecutive years. Huntley was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.

Steve Pauly (1991)
Steve was the nation's top decathlete in 1965 by scoring 7,648 points. He is in the top 10 in school history in the javelin. He won the Northern Division of the Pacific Coast Conference in javelin as a freshman. Pauly was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1988. Tracy Smith (1991)
Smith was a two-time National AAU/TAC champion in the 10,000 meters and in 1968 set a NCAA record with a time of 28:27.0. He was the second man in NCAA history to score in three different events at the NCAA Championships. Smith finished 11th in the 1968 Olympic Games. At the time of his inducted he ranked third in OSU history in the 10,000 meters.

Forrest Smithson (1988)
Smithson was the world and U.S. record holder in the 110-high hurdles, and won gold at the 1908 Olympics. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Dale Story (2006)
Dale Story is one of the premier student-athletes in the history of Oregon State University. The four-year letterman won the individual title at the 1961 NCAA Men's Country Championships, and in the process guided the school to its first ever NCAA team title. In that national championship race, Story beat six future Olympians as he ran barefoot in 30-degree weather. During his OSU career, Story also earned track and field All-America honors in 1962 in the three-mile run, and he set 13 course or meet records. In the spring of 1961, Story set a world juniors record for the two-mile run (8:46.9) at the California Relays. Story and his cross country teammates from 1961 were inducted into the OSU Sports Hall of Fame in 1991.

Grant Swan (1990)
Grant lettered in track from 1919-22 and then coached the program from 1946-70. He was a three-time Pacific Coast Conference champion miler and held the school record for 34 years. Swan was unbeaten in the mile during his college career. The Beavers won the 1946 conference title with Swan at the helm. Swan was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Willie Turner (1997)
Turner lettered in track from 1967-70. He holds the OSU record in the 100 meters with a time of 10.00, the world's fastest mark at the time in 1967. He also holds the school record in the 100-yard and 220-yard dashes. He won the NCAA title and earned All-American honors in the 220 in 1970. Turner captured the Pac-8 Northern Division title in the 100-yard dash in 1968. He is the second all-time leading dual meet point scorer at OSU (175). Turner was the 1967 National College Freshman of the Year. He also shared the world record for the 50-yard dash indoor mark in 1968, and set a new conference championships record in the 220 in 1970.

Tom Woods (2005)
Tom Woods is one of the premier track athletes in the history of Oregon State University. Woods' resume includes being a four-time All-American in the high jump, including capturing the 1972 national title with a mark of 7-3 1/4. He is one of 11 individuals in the history of the program to win an NCAA title. Woods still holds the OSU record in the high jump with a leap of 7-4 1/2 in a 1973 meet. In the ‘73 season he captured the Pac-8 Conference title. He led the team to a fifth-place finish at the 1974 NCAA Championships. Woods also won the 1975 AAU title with a then meet record of 7-5 1/2.

Karl Van Calcar (1994)
Karl lettered in track from 1984-88 where he captured the 1988 NCAA steeplechase title and the Pac-10 title. In 1985 he won the 5000 meters and placed second in the steeplechase in the Pac-10 and ninth at the NCAA's. In all, Van Calcar captured five All-American honors, including two in cross-country. During his career he set many Oregon State and Patrick Wayne Valley Field records. He finished sixth at the 1992 Olympic Trials.

Tim Vollmer (1993)
Tim lettered three years from 1967-69, earning All-American status in '68 and '69 in the discus after finishing second both times. He also was the runner-up in the 1968 and '69 Pac-8 meets. Vollmer broke the school record in 1968 (204-2) and tied that mark one year later. He was named the most improved athlete in '68 and most inspirational in '69. His international career included competing in the '72 Olympic Games. He captured eight titles in a five-year span, including the 1971 AAU title. He was named the Athlete of the Year in '71 by a group of southern California track writers. Also a prep All-American in 1965 at Benson Tech in Portland.

WRESTLING

Jim Baumgardner (2006)
Jim Baumgardner is one of the top wrestlers in Oregon State history. Baumgardner currently ranks third at OSU for career victories with 155, and he holds the school single-season record for wins with 52 in 1983. Baumgardner earned All-America honors twice, including finishing second in 1984 in the 190-pound weight class. He won three individual Pac-10 titles. The Roseburg native was twice selected All-Pacific-10 Conference. During his illustrious career, Baumgardner helped the Beavers win 88 dual meets, capture two conference titles and finish in the top 15 at the NCAA Championships twice. He also was a standout in the classroom and was awarded an NCAA postgraduate scholarship in 1984.

Larry Bielenberg (1994)
Larry lettered at OSU from 1974-77 earning All-American honors all four years of his collegiate career. He won the national title as a heavyweight in 1975 and the Pac-8 champion twice. He is second at OSU for career victories with 168 and is the school record holder for career falls with 95. He also ranks in the top five at OSU for falls in one season and consecutive victories. His record of 51-1-0 in 1977 is second all-time. During Beilenberg's tenure the Beavers finished in the top 15 at the NCAA Tournament four times, including fifth in 1977. The team also captured two conference titles. His international competition includes participation in the 1976 Olympic Games as a first alternate, 1975 Junior World Championships, and 1978 Mexico City World Championships. He participated in the East-West All-Star Meet and is a member of the OSU Wrestling Hall of Fame.

Virgil Cavagnaro (1991)
Virgil has been credited with improving the state of wrestling at the prep and collegiate level in Oregon. He captured seven AAU titles at 177, 190, and heavyweight while wrestling for the Multnomah Athletic Club. He won the 191-pound title at the national AAU meet. Cavagnaro, who lettered at Oregon State in 1941 and '42, served as a referee for over 25 years. He is a former president of the OSU Dads' Club and Portland Beaver Club.

Don Conway (1991)
Don captured three Pacific Coast Conference titles at 177 from 1959-61. He helped Oregon State to a 41-5-1 dual meet record and a fourth-place finish at the NCAA Championships in 1961. He teamed with John Dustin to form the Beavers' famed "murderer's row." He also finished fourth in the 1958 and 1960 National Freestyle Championships. Conway later coached at UCLA.

Jim Crumley (2005)
Jim Crumley earned All-American status three times while wrestling at 177 pounds. The three-year letterman (1970-71, 73) concluded his OSU career with 67 individual victories.Crumley finished second at the 1973 NCAA Championships, fourth in 1971 and third in 1970. He won three Pacific-8 Conference titles. At the time of his induction he ranked 12th at OSU for career winning percentage at .867. He was a standout at the international level as well, earning a gold medal at the 1973 South African Games at 180.5 pounds. The native of nearby Lebanon also placed third at the 1972 U.S. Olympic trials and at the National Greco-Roman competition. Crumley served as an assistant coach at OSU from 1983-89.

Ron Finley (1991)
Ron was the conference champion at 137 pounds in 1961 and 1962. He finished second at the 137 in the 1961 NCAA Championships. He competed on the national level winning the 1963 Greco-Roman National title and later captured a gold medal at the Pan American Games. He also was a member of the 1964 Olympic Team. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982. Finley is also a member of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame.

Fritz Fivian (1992)
Fivian was a three-year letterman wrestler at Oregon State, and a three-time (1959-61) Pacific Coast Conference champion at 167 pounds. NAAU freestyle champion at 160.5 pounds in freestyle in 1959, and was runner-up in '60. He was second at the National Greco-Roman Tournament in 1959, fourth in '58, and third in '57. He participated internationally in the 1960 Rome Olympic Games in Greco-Roman and toured Eastern Europe in 1959. Fivian, who is a member of the OSU Wrestling Hall of Fame, went on to coach at Rex Putnam High School in Milwaukie for 19 years.

Les Gutches (2003)
Les was a four-year letterman who was considered the best OSU wrestler in modern history. He compiled a record of 134-10 and was named Outstanding Wrestler at the NCAA Championships as a senior. He was also named Outstanding Wrestler at the U.S. Nationals in 1996. He won two NCAA titles at 177 and was a three-time Academic All-American. His post-collegiate career included numerous international competitions and titles. He was a gold medalist at the 1998 Goodwill Games, the bronze at the 1999 World Championships, and a member of the 1996 U.S. Olympic Team. He has coached internationally and assisted coaching at OSU.

Herb Haberlach (1991)
Herb was a heavyweight alternate at the 1952 Olympic Games. He won the 1950 Pacific Coast Conference heavyweight title. Haberlach is a member of the Oregon State Wrestling Hall of Fame.

Howard Harris (1997)
Howard Harris is one of the greatest wrestlers in the history of Oregon State University. He lettered from 1977-80. He was a four-time All-American at 190 pounds and heavyweight, including capturing the NCAA title in '80. He won three Pac-10 Conference titles. At the time of his induction he held the school record for career wins (169), ranked second for career falls (87), and first for single season falls (40, 1980). He posted a perfect 46-0 season in 1980, and during his career had a 47-match win streak. He helped OSU to four top-10 finishes at the NCAA Tournament.

Dan Hicks (1994)
Dan lettered at Oregon State from 1976-79 and captured NCAA titles at 142 pounds in 1978 and 1979. He won two conference titles and recorded an undefeated season of 45-0-2 in 1978. His 45 victories ranked fourth for a single season at OSU at the time of his induction. He also ranks in the top-10 for falls in a season with 17. Hicks later served as an assistant coach at Oregon State. He is a member of the OSU Wrestling Hall of Fame.

Len Kauffman (1991)
Len is arguably the best wrestler ever to compete at Oregon State. He earned three conference titles and earned All-American status three times as well. He also was a four-time AAU All-American, including National Freestyle titles in 1964 and 1969. He pinned every dual meet opponent during the 1964 and 1965 seasons and broke the school record twice for falls in one season. He was a member or the 1966 U.S. World Championship team and placed second in the 1964 and 1966 Greco-Roman National Championships.

Bobak Mohammadi (2003)
Babak Mohammadi lettered four years in wrestling from 1991-95, redshirting in 1993 due to an injury. He was a four-time All-American, twice at 126 pounds as a freshman and sophomore, and twice at 134 pounds as a junior and senior. Mohammadi was the runner-up at the NCAA Championships his final two years and helped OSU to second place in the team standings in '95. Mohammadi twice won conference titles at 134. The North Salem High School graduate completed his eligibility ninth for all-time victories at OSU with 117, and his 32 victories as a freshman in 1991 ranked second at the time.

Chet Newton (1991)
Chet won a Silver Medal at the 1924 Olympic Games in Paris. He finished runner-up to teammate and three-time National Freestyle Champion Robin Reed. Newton helped the Aggies win the 1927 AAU title. He also was a member of the varsity cross-country team for three years. Newton was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Robin Reed (1988)
Chosen the greatest wrestler of his half-century, he won the 1924 Olympic gold and three national titles. During his Olympic gold medal run, he pinned all of his opponents. He also competed in the 1920 Olympics. He later coached Oregon State for two seasons. Reed was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Henk Schenk (1992)
Schenk won conference titles at 191 pounds in 1965 and '66, and went on to a stellar post-collegiate career. He won three AAU National Freestyle titles and overall had nine top five finishes. Schenk earned a bronze medal at the 1969 World Championships in Argentina and was a member of the 1968 and '72 U.S. Olympic Team. He also won international titles in Greco-Roman competition in 1971, '72, and '75.

Greg Strobel (1993)
Greg lettered for head coach Dale Thomas from 1971-74. He earned two national titles at 190 pounds in 1973 and '74. He finished his career with a remarkable 126-8-1 mark, a school record at the time. He also was a three-time All-American. Strobel was selected the 1973 NCAA Tournament's Outstanding Wrestler after his first title, completing a 38-0-0 season. He captured three Pac-8 Conference titles. He also holds the school record for consecutive wins at 74. Internationally, he placed among the top three in the National Freestyle Tournament three times and wrestled in the 1973 South African Games. He served as the National Teams Director for eight years. He coached USA teams competing in Japan, the Soviet Union, and Europe. Greg also worked in official capacities at the Olympic games in Los Angeles and Barcelona. At the time of his enshrinement, he was coaching an Olympic level club in Pennsylvania that had won seven consecutive national titles.

Roger Weigel (1993)
Roger lettered from 1969-71. He captured the NCAA Championship at 134 pounds in 1971 defeating the defending two-time champion. Coach Dale Thomas called his title match, "the finest single performance by a Beaver he had ever seen." Weigel was a three-time Pac-8 Champion, and posted marks of 33-1 as a senior and 27-2-1 as a junior. He was a member of the 1970 National Federation Team to Europe. He is a member of the Oregon State Wrestling Hall of Fame. Weigel won the Oregon AAU freestyle title in 1967 and '68.

COACHES

Dee Andros (1991)
"The Great Pumpkin" spent 10 years as the head football coach and led the Beavers to four second-place finishes in the Pac-8. His 1967 "Giant Killers" beat No. 1 USC and the No. 2 ranked teams from Purdue and UCLA. He was named Oregon's Man of the Year in 1967. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986, the Idaho Hall of Fame in 1988, and the NACDA Hall of Fame in 1990. He also served as Oregon State's athletic director from 1976-1985. Andros received Oregon State's Martin Chaves Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003.

Sam Bell (2006)
Sam Bell was Oregon State's track and field and cross country coach from 1958-65. His 1961 cross country won the national title, the first NCAA team championship for Oregon State. His 1963 4x880 relay team set a world record in the California Relays. Bell coached five individual NCAA champs in track and field, guided OSU to a pair of top-10 finishes at the NCAAs, and had three athletes compete in the Olympics. He was inducted into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1992 and the U.S. Track and Field Coaches Hall of Fame in 2000. Bell also coached at California and Indiana, and is in the Indiana University Athletics Hall of Fame. Bell coached at the 1976 Olympics and with the 1979 USA World Cup Team.

Ralph Coleman (1990)
The "Silver Fox" led Oregon State to Northern Division crowns in 1940, '51, '52, '58, '62, '63 and co-titles in 1938 and '42. The 1952 team advanced to the College World Series. Coleman ended his coaching career with a winning percentage of .639. Oregon State's baseball field is named in his honor. State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame inductee in 1981.

Karl Drlica (1991)
Karl built one of the strongest crew programs in the nation. He became Oregon State's head coach in 1950 and was the central figure for developing the program into an intercollegiate sport in 1968. Drlica, a former crew athlete at OSU, was also involved on the national scale, serving on the board of the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen.

Amory "Slats" Gill (1988)
Gill is a member of the Naismith Hall of Fame after leading Oregon State to 599 victories in 36 years. Oregon State's home arena is name in his honor. Gill coached the program to five Pacific Coast Conference titles, four Northern Division championships, and to a pair of Final Four appearances. His teams won eight consecutive Far West Classic titles. He also played at Oregon State, where he earned 1924 All-American honors. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Ralph Miller (1991)
At the time of his retirement in 1989, he was the sixth winningest coach in Division I history with 674 wins. He led OSU to four Pac-10 titles, eight NCAA Tournament appearances, three NIT appearances, and led five OSU teams that were ranked in the top 10. He was named Pac-10 Coach of the Year twice, AP Coach of the Year twice, District VIII Coach of the Year Five times, and NIT Kodak Man of the Year in 1988. He is a member of the James Naismith, State of Kansas, Kansas University, and State of Oregon Sports Halls of Fame.

Tommy Prothro (1990)
Tommy Prothro guided Oregon State to a 10-year (1955-64) mark of 63-37-2, which included two appearances in the Rose Bowl and one in the Liberty Bowl. He coached 1962 Heisman Trophy recipient Terry Baker among numerous other All-Americans. He played in the 1942 Rose Bowl for Duke against Oregon State. Prothro would later coach at UCLA (1965-70) and finish his collegiate coaching career with a mark of 104-55-5. He coached professionally for the Los Angeles Rams and the San Diego Chargers before his retirement. Prothro is a member of the Duke Hall of Fame and was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1989.

Lon Stiner (1990)
Lon Stiner was the head football coach at Oregon State from 1933-42. His teams compiled an impressive overall record of 74-49-17, which included the 1942 victory over Duke in the only Rose Bowl not played in Pasadena - the game was moved to Durham, N.C. due to World War II precautions. He coached the 1933 Ironmen, a team known for the now illegal Pyramid kick blocking play.

Dale Thomas (1992)
Dale Thomas served as the school's wrestling coach from 1956-90, and finished his career as the NCAA's all-time winningest coach with a record of 616-169-12. He was the first collegiate wrestling coach to reach the 500-victory plateau. Under Thomas, Oregon State had 60 All-Americans (10 champions, 12 runner-ups), 116 conference champions, and six Olympic wrestlers. His teams won 22 conference titles, including 15 straight from 1959-73, and 13 of his teams finished in the top 10 at the NCAA Championships. Thomas is a member of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 1980, the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame, Helms Foundation Hall of Fame, Cornell College of Iowa Hall of Fame, and the Iowa Wrestling Hall of Fame. During his competitive days, he won nine national titles in collegiate freestyle and Greco-Roman, and was a member of the 1952 and '56 Olympic teams.

Paul Valenti (1990)
Paul Valenti is one of the most recognizable names in Oregon State University athletics history. He lettered in basketball from 1940-42, playing on two Northern Division champion teams. He then served as the longtime assistant coach to Slats Gill before being named the head coach in 1965. He was the Pac-8 Conference Coach of the Year after leading the Beavers to the league title, ending UCLA's lengthy run of conference crowns. He later served as the tennis coach and as an associate athletic director. As of June of 2003, Valenti was still involved with the department in a special assistant role. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1982. Valenti received OSU's Martin Chaves Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001.

Berny Wagner (1993)
Berny served as the head track coach at OSU from 1966-75 where his teams compiled a dual meet mark of 49-24. He led OSU to top-20 finishes at the NCAA Championships six times and in the top six four times. Wagner coached some of OSU's best ever track athletes such as Dick Fosbury, Steve DeAutremont, Jim Judd, Ed Lipscomb, Jim Barkley, Tom Woods, Willlie Turner, and Hailu Eba. During Wagner's tenure, 15 individuals won 23 All-American honors, and nine athletes captured individual NCAA titles. Wagner was also influential on the national and international scene, serving as a member of the U.S. Track and Field Rules Committee and as the National Coach/Coordinator for all U.S. National Track and Field Teams.

ADMINISTRATION

James Barratt (1997)
Barrett was associated with Oregon State University for over 40 years, beginning in 1946. During that time he served as athletic director, assistant director, business manager, ticket manager, assistant alumni director, and editor of the Daily Barometer. Barratt was active in many conference and NCAA committees while serving as the A.D. Under his leadership and fund-raising efforts, OSU expanded Parker Stadium, installed AstroTurf, and he was a key figure in the installation of an all-weather track at Patrick Wayne Valley Field. Barratt was also responsible for the creation of Kiwanis Kids Day, Beaver Caravans, Band Day, and the reorganization of the Beaver Club. He was inducted into the National Association of Collegiate Directors of America Hall of Fame in 1991.

John Eggers (1991)
John served as the sports information director at OSU for three decades. His work with sportswriters and broadcasters throughout the nation helped Terry Baker win the Heisman Trophy, the first ever by the player west of the Mississippi River. He was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.

Irwin Harris (1994)
Irwin served as athletic news director from 1942-51. He was responsible for organizing the athletic news bureau in Gill Coliseum in 1950. In addition to his new bureau position, he served as the men's varsity tennis coach from 1943-64. His teams amassed a dual match record of 154-53, including 30-7 vs. rival Oregon. He led four teams to the NCAA Tournament with the 1962 squad finishing 12th. Harris graduated from OSU in 1941 with a bachelor degree in education. While at Oregon State he was the sports desk editor of the Daily Barometer and was editor of the 1941 Beaver Yearbook. He later earned a masters degree from Northwestern University.

Roy S. Spec Keene (1991)
Keene served as athletic director from 1947-64, the longest anyone has held that position. Under his direction Gill Coliseum and Parker Stadium were constructed. He served on the executive committee of the NCAA and president of the Pacific Coast Conference Athletic Directors Association to name two of the many national boards he was a part of.

Bill Robertson (1991)
Bill Robertson was the first full-time athletic trainer at OSU, beginning in 1946. He has been inducted into the Helms Foundation Hall of Fame for trainers. Robertson received the Pac-10 Conference's Distinguished Award, National Athletic Trainers Association 25-Year Award, and was an Honorary Varsity "O" Club member.

TEAMS

1932-33 Basketball
Under the leadership of Slats Gill, the 1933 team earned Oregon State's first ever Pacific Coast Conference title. The team defeated USC in the best of three series to earn the championship. Oregon State recorded a 21-6 mark overall and 12-4 in league. Ed Lewis, who earned All-American honors, was the league's top scorer with 173 conference points. The remainder of the roster included Everett Davis, Merle Taylor, Snowy Gustafson, George Hibbard, Fred Hill, Clarence James, George Baldwin, Carl Lenchitsky, Bob Lucas, Red MacDonald, and Skeet O'Connell.

1933 Ironmen
A forecasted rebuilding year for first-year head coach Lon Stiner turned into a 6-2-2 season. The team shut out six opponents. This team is most famous for the now illegal pyramid kick blocking play. Red Franklin and Ade Schwammel were selected as All-Americans.

1939 Football Team
Lon Stiner guided the 1939 team to a record of 9-1-1, a school record that stood for over six decades. OSC finished third in the Pacific Coast Conference, with the only loss to eventual conference champion USC -- the tie was with UCLA. Several Oregon State players received postseason honors. Eberle Schultz at guard and Jim Kisselburgh at fullback were selected to the All-Coast Team. Schultz also garnered AP second team All-American status. Three Beavers received UPI honorable mention All-American acclaim- Schultz, Vic Sears, and John Tsoutsouvas. Three team members were drafted into the professional ranks- Schultz by Philadelphia, John Hackenbruck by Detroit, and Morris Kohler by Cleveland. The Orangemen opened with five consecutive nailbiting victories by an average margin of under seven points. The only loss of the season came in game six to mighty USC before rebounding for a 19-14 victory at Oregon, its fourth straight over the Ducks. Bob Olsen had a 92-yard kickoff return against Oregon.

1942 Rose Bowl Team
Due to the blackout on the West Coast because of World War II precautions, the 1942 Rose Bowl was played in Durham, N.C. against the Duke Blue Devils. The team, led by head coach Lon Stiner, scored a 20-16 upset victory. Tommy Prothro, who would later be the head coach at Oregon State from 1955-64, quarterbacked Duke. The winning score was in the third quarter when Gene Gray snatched a 68-yard pass from Bob Dethman. Oregon State's other scores came on a Dethman 31-yard pass to George Zellick and a Don Durdan 15-yard run. Warren Simas made two extra point kicks. The team was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.

1948-49 Basketball
Slats Gill's team was the second in Oregon State history to advance to the NCAA Tournament, where it finished fourth. The team posted a 24-12 overall record and won the Pacific Coast Conference title by defeating UCLA twice. The team was led by two-time All-American Cliff Crandall, who averaged 12 points per game in conference action. The remainder of the roster included Dick Ballantyne, Ed Flemming, Bill Harper, Tommy Holman, Glen Kinney, Alex Petersen, Len Rinearson, Rudy Rupe, Paul Sliper, Ray Snyder, Dan Torrey, and Harvey Watt. Paul Valenti was the assistant coach and Waldo Ball was the team physician. The team was inducted into the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.

1952 Baseball Team
As of June 2003, this was Oregon State's only College World Series baseball team. Coached by the legendary Ralph Coleman, Oregon State actually finished in a tie with Washington for first place in the Pacific Coast Conference's Northern Division, but the Beavers won the regular season series earning a berth into a three-game match-up with Southern Division champion USC. The Beavers won the first two games by scores of 12-10 and 5-4 to move on to district play. Oregon State again won the first two games of a best of three series with 2-1 and 8-4 wins over Fresno State, which advanced the team to the CWS. Team member Dwane Helbig became Oregon State's first All-American in the sport after batting a school record .411 for the season. Bailey Brem, Danny Johnston, Chuck Fisk, and Pete Goodbrod earned second team all-league acclaim. Pitcher Don White was selected the team MVP.

1954-55 Men's Basketball Team
Amory "Slats" Gill led the 1954-55 men's basketball team to the Pacific Coast Conference title. The team ended the season with a 22-8 record and a 15-1 mark in Northern Division action. The Orangemen, as they were known then, captured the Pacific Coast Conference title by beating Southern Division champion No. 9 UCLA twice. Oregon State played in the NCAA Tournament for the third time in the history of the program and advanced to the West Regional championship game against the Bill Russell led San Francisco Dons. The Orangemen defeated Seattle University in the team's first action of the tournament led by Swede Halbrook's 21 points and nine rebounds. The victory set up one of the biggest contests in the history of Gill Coliseum between No. 12 Oregon State and No. 1 San Francisco. The Dons, who earlier in the season beat the short-handed OSC squad by 26 points, won a classic 57-56 game for the berth into the NCAA Final Four – where they would win the national title. Gill Coliseum rocked for the 1954-55 season as three of the six biggest crowds in the history of the building witnessed the memorable season. Oregon State swept four-game league series' with Oregon, Washington and Idaho, and won three of four vs. Washington State. Halbrook earned postseason honors as an All-American, All-Pacific Coast Conference and All-Northern Division. Tony Vlastelica earned Honorable Mention All-American. Jay Dean and Vlastelica were named second team on the All-Northern Division squad, and Reggie Halligan earned Honorable Mention. The remaining members of the team roster included Jimmy Jarboe, Tex Whitemen, Bob Allord, Ron Fundingsland, Ron Robins, Larry Paulus, Phil Shadoin, Bill Toole, Ralph Carroll, Bob Sutton, Dick Wilson, Gary Babcock, Ron Johnson (mgr.), Paul Valenti (asst. coach), Bill Robertson (trainer) and Waldo Ball (physician).

1956 Football Team
Tommy Prothro, in only his second year on the Oregon State campus, guided the Beavers to their second Rose Bowl. The Beavers finished the season with a record of 7-3-1. They started the campaign 1-2 before embarking on a six-game winning streak with victories over California, WSU, UCLA, Washington, Stanford, and Idaho. OSC and Oregon played to a tie in the final regular season game before the Beavers traveled to Pasadena where they fell 35-19 to Big Ten champion Iowa. Earnel Durdan and John Witte were named to the All-Coast and All-Pacific Coast Conference teams. Witte, who played tackle, also earned consensus All-American acclaim. Dick Corrick and Gerry Laird served as team captains. Other team awards went to Ernie Zwahlen for attitude and scholarship and Joe Francis as team MVP. Francis accounted for 2003 yards in total offense in the Rose Bowl.

1961 Cross Country Team
The 1961 cross country team earned Oregon State's only NCAA Championship (as of 6/2003), and it marked the first time in 23 years that OSU had competed in a NCAA event. Dale Story, who ran the four-mile race barefooted, won the individual title with a time of 19:46.6. The meet was held at Michigan State University in 32-degree weather and a 20 mile-per-hour wind. Beaver Richard Cuddihy also earned All-American honors by placing 12th and two other Oregon State runners finished in the top 25. The team, coached by Sam Bell, scored 68 points. Team members included Story, Cuddihy, Jerry Brady, William Boyd, and Clifford Thompson.

1962-63 Men's Basketball
Slats Gill guided the 1963 men's basketball team to a record of 22-9 and the NCAA West Regional title with victories over Seattle, San Francisco, and No. 3 Arizona State. The school's last Final Four team, at the time of its enshrinement in 2003, fell to No. 1 Cincinnati in the semifinals and No. 2 Duke in the consolation game. The Beavers were led by center Mel Counts, who averaged 21.3 points and 15.6 rebounds during his junior season. Counts was an All-American selection and was named the MVP of the '63 West Regional. Heisman Trophy winner Terry Baker averaged 13.4 points, while forward Steve Pauly added 9.2 and guard Frank Peters 9.1. The team sputtered to a 2-3 start, before winning 10 of its next 11 contests. The Beavers captured the Far West Classic for the seventh consecutive time with victories over Idaho, California, and Iowa. The team also won three of four games against rival Oregon, including sweeping the Ducks in Eugene. The team roster also included Lynn Baxter, Rex Benner, Tim Campbell, Grant Harter, Dave Hayward, Jim Jarvis, Jim Kraus, Gary Rossi, and Ray Torgerson. Paul Valenti served as the assistant coach, Bill Robertson as athletic trainer, Dr. Waldo Ball as the team physician, and Corky Smith as team manager. Oregon State was the only school from the Pacific Northwest to participate in more than one Final Four, as of 2003.

1964 Football Team
The 1964 season marked Oregon State's return to a conference schedule after spending five seasons as an independent. the Beavers went 8-3 overall and 3-1 in the Athletic Association of Western Universities, earning the nod over co-champion Southern California for the conference's berth in the Rose Bowl. In Pasadena, OSU fell 34-7 to fourth-ranked Michigan on Jan. 1, 1965. The Beavers lost their season-opener at Northwestern before capturing seven straight victories over Colorado, Baylor, Washington, Idaho, Syracuse, Washington State and Indiana to climb to No. 16 in the national rankings. The first four of those wins were all by a touchdown or less, including victories of 9-7 over Washington in Portland and 10-7 over Idaho in Corvallis. The win streak ended with a 16-7 loss at Stanford. Oregon State then greeted Oregon for the Civil War; the Ducks were ranked 17th in the nation and had Rose Bowl hopes of their own. Booker Washington's touchdown - the first of his career - and Steve Jones' extra point with 54 seconds remaining enabled OSu to defeat the Ducks 7-6. Al East's block of an Oregon extra point attempt in the second quarter proved to be the difference. Washington and Dick Ruhl served as the team captains. Linebacker Jack O'Billovich earned All-Coast honors and defensive back Dan Espalin and offensive tackle Rich Koeper were all-conference selections. Espalin was also selected the team's Most Valuable Player. O'Billovich went on to play in the East-West Shrine Game and the Hula Bowl. Halfback Cliff Watkins earned the team's Most Improved Player award, guard Al Funston was the Attitude and Scholarship award recipient and quarterback Paul Brothers was the Rookie of the Year.

1966 Basketball Team
Paul Valenti coached the 1966 Beavers to their first and only Pac-8 Conference title. OSU compiled a 21-7 overall mark and 12-2 in the Pac-8. The league title by OSU marked the only time in Pac-8 history a team other than UCLA captured the crown. Oregon State opened league play by losing at UCLA before winning 12 of the next 13, including a 13-point victory at home over the Bruins and a season ending two-game sweep of Oregon. The Beavers advanced to the NCAA playoffs where they defeated Elvin Hayes and Houston in the opening round, 63-60, before suffering a second round loss to Utah. OSU also won the Far West Classic title and in the process, its 27th straight game at the tournament. The team finished the season as the NCAA's top defensive squad allowing only 54.5 points per game, with 10 opponents failing to eclipse the 50-point plateau. Loy Petersen led the team for scoring average at 12.8 points with Charlie White at 11.7, Scott Eaton at 9.9, and Ed Fredenburg at 9.6. Fredenburg led the club for rebounding at 7.4. White was honored as a Helms Foundation All-American, All-Pacific Coast, All-Pac-8, NCAA Western Regional All-Star, Sports Network All-Star, and team MVP. Petersen joined White on the Sports Network All-Star squad and Rick Whelan joined White on the NCAA Western Regional team. Valenti was assisted by Jim Anderson, Bill Harper, and Jim Jarvis. The team roster included: Bob Franz, Ray Carlile, Charlie White, Karl Weide, Gary Wilken, Larry French, Ed Fredenburg, Dave Fox, Loy Petersen, Harry Gunner, Rick Whelan, Scott Eaton, Terry Vaughn (manager), and Bill Robertson (trainer).

1967 Football Team
This is arguably the most famous football team in Oregon State history. Budded the "Giant Killers," the team finished No. 7 in the Associated Press Poll and No. 8 in the United Press International Poll. The team finished with a 7-2-1 record, and tied for second in the conference. The team beat No. 1 ranked USC 3-0, No. 2 Purdue 22-14, and two weeks later played UCLA, the new No. 2 ranked team, earning a 16-16 tie. Dee Andros was in his third year as head coach. Jon Sandstrom and Jess Lewis earned All-American honors. Bill Enyart, Gary Houser and Dave Marlette were all-conference selections, and Enyart also was an Academic All-American. Team captains were Marlette and Skip Vanderbundt. Other awards included Enyart and Harry Gunner as Most Improved, Vanderbundt and Steve Preece shared MVP honors, and Marlette won the Attitude and Scholarship Award. The team was inducted into the State of Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1992.

1980-81 Men's Basketball Team
Head coach Ralph Miller guided the 1980-81 men's basketball team to the Pacific-10 title, a No. 1 ranking in the national polls, and 26 straight wins; OSU finished 26-2 overall and 17-1 in the Pac-10. Miller earned numerous national awards, while senior center Steve Johnson earned All-America and Pac-10 Player of the Year honors. Senior guards Ray Blume and Mark Radford were named All-Pac-10. The team included Miller, Johnson, Blume, Radford, William Brew, Lester Conner, Danny Evans, Rob Holbrook, Raymond Lankford, Steve Lankton, Scott McKie, Bill McShane, Charlie Sitton, Jamie Stangel, Brett Starr, Jeff Stoutt, Alan Tait and Jeff Wilson; assistant coaches Jimmy Anderson, Lanny Van Eman and Steve Seidler; trainer Bill Robertson, student manager Ken Schaudt and equipment manager Bill Wojciechowskie.

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